I Tried Martha Stewart’s Favorite Egg Salad Recipe


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One thing I admire about Martha Stewart is her effortless refinement. Her unexpected upgrades can transform a dish from meh to magical. It’s for this very reason I crowned her the winner of our lemon bar showdown: Her use of sweetened condensed milk in the filling created the most perfectly balanced treat.

Unsurprisingly, Martha’s favorite egg salad has a few details that set it apart from the other recipes I tried. Most notably, she uses mostly hard-boiled egg whites and only two yolks. Hers is also the only recipe that calls for light mayonnaise, and she also incorporates an entire avocado into the salad. Other than that it’s a pretty bare-bones recipe — no herbs or shallots like some of the other contenders.

If this recipe is good enough to be Martha’s favorite, it must be delicious, right? Here’s my honest review.  

How to Make Martha Stewart’s Favorite Egg Salad Sandwich

Martha’s recipe uses 10 eggs and does not offer any instructions for how to boil them. I opted for what I consider the most traditional method: dropping the eggs into boiling water for 12 minutes, then cooling in an ice bath.

After the eggs cool a bit, you’ll cut them in half and remove all but two yolks. Transfer the whites and reserved yolks to a large bowl and chop the eggs with a pastry blender. Mash half an avocado, roughly chop the other half, then gently fold all of it into the egg mixture. Stir in light mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, and lemon juice, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Martha serves her egg salad on white sandwich bread such as Pullman, but I tried mine plain and on sliced potato bread to keep things consistent across all recipe tests.

My Honest Review of Martha Stewart’s Favorite Egg Salad Sandwich

I personally love egg yolks in egg salad. In fact, the texture and mouthfeel of the yolks combined with the mayo is a distinct part of why egg salad is so delicious. But Martha’s version took most of the yolks out of the equation. I suspect she does this to reduce the amount of saturated fat in the dish, because she replaces them with avocados, famous for their unsaturated fat. She also uses a few tablespoons of light mayonnaise.

Even though I generally like avocado in things and I enjoyed the flavor of this salad, it lacked the unctuous qualities I love about egg salad. Each time I tasted it, everything fell a little flat on the palate. It just wasn’t as satisfying without the yolks in it. I also didn’t like the fact I was wasting all those yolks — eight cooked egg yolks in the trash. This egg salad also needed some sort of allium, such as shallots, scallions, or chives. As I’ve learned throughout this egg salad showdown, alliums bring so much delicious flavor to egg salad, and Martha’s version fell short in that department. 

I will say that I love my old pastry blender and it doesn’t get used much these days, and I always enjoy learning new ways to put it to work. I thought Martha’s suggestion of smashing the eggs with a pastry blender was an ingenious way to use this tool.

If You’re Going to Make Martha’s Egg Salad, a Few Tips

Have you ever made Martha Stewart’s egg salad recipe? Let us know in the comments!





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