Spring Pea & Basil Soup


This pea soup is a perfect first course or light meal — so simple, so fresh and so good for you.

The kids’ cheeks are sun-kissed, the bikes are out of the garage, and the pansies are planted – it’s official, spring is finally here! It’s been a long time coming, so this springy pea soup with fresh basil tastes all the better. It’s the perfect first course or light meal, and you can serve it hot or cold, depending on the weather.

What You’ll Need To Make Pea Soup with Basil
pea soup ingredientsStep-by-step instructions

Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium-low heat, and add the shallots.

shallots in pot Gently cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and translucent, 8 to 10 minutes.

softened shallots in pot

Add the vegetable broth, peas, salt, and pepper. adding broth, peas, and seasoning to pot

Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, uncovered, for about 10 minutes.

pea soup coming to a boil

Remove the pan from the heat and add the basil, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and lime juice.

adding basil and cheese to pea soup

Purée with a stick blender until smooth and creamy. Be patient; peas take a long time to purée and you want it as smooth as possible. (If you don’t have a stick blender, let the soup cool slightly and purée it in batches in a blender. Be sure to crack the lid or remove the center cap to allow the steam to escape and cover with a dish towel so it won’t splatter.)

pureeing the pea soup with a stick blender

Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary.

finished pea soup in pot

Ladle the soup into bowls and serve hot, or chill and serve cold.

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Pea Soup with Basil

This pea soup is a perfect first course or light meal — so simple, so fresh and so good for you.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup roughly chopped shallots
  • 6 cups low sodium vegetable broth (I like Swanson organic)
  • 6 cups (2 pounds) frozen peas
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped fresh basil leaves, plus more for serving
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, from 1 lime

Instructions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium-low heat. Add the shallots and gently cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and translucent, 8 to 10 minutes.
  2. Add the vegetable broth, peas, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium and cook for 10 minutes.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat and add the basil, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and lime juice. Purée with a stick blender until smooth and creamy. Be patient; you want it as smooth as possible. (If you don’t have a stick blender, let the soup cool slightly and purée it in batches in a blender. Be sure to crack the lid or remove the center cap to allow the steam to escape and cover with a dish towel so it won’t splatter.) Taste and adjust seasoning, if necessary. Ladle the soup into bowls and serve with more basil, if desired. (Alternatively, chill the soup and serve cold.)
  4. Note: This soup will thicken as it cools. If necessary, add a bit of water to thin to desired consistency.
  5. Freezer-Friendly Instructions: The soup can be frozen for up to 3 months. When ready to serve, defrost overnight in the refrigerator and then reheat on the stovetop over medium heat until hot.

Pair with

Nutrition Information

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  • Calories: 219
  • Fat: 9g
  • Saturated fat: 2g
  • Carbohydrates: 27g
  • Sugar: 10g
  • Fiber: 8g
  • Protein: 11g
  • Sodium: 752mg
  • Cholesterol: 3mg

This website is written and produced for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and the nutritional data on this site has not been evaluated or approved by a nutritionist or the Food and Drug Administration. Nutritional information is offered as a courtesy and should not be construed as a guarantee. The data is calculated through an online nutritional calculator, Edamam.com. Although I do my best to provide accurate nutritional information, these figures should be considered estimates only. Varying factors such as product types or brands purchased, natural fluctuations in fresh produce, and the way ingredients are processed change the effective nutritional information in any given recipe. Furthermore, different online calculators provide different results depending on their own nutrition fact sources and algorithms. To obtain the most accurate nutritional information in a given recipe, you should calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients used in your recipe, using your preferred nutrition calculator.

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